Description

Edam and gouda originated in Holland over 800 years ago. The name "edam" comes from a town of the same name in southern Holland. The village of gouda shares the same valley. Originally, cheesemakers shaped edam into balls to roll down the gangplanks of ships for export, and since edam has a firmer texture than gouda, it maintained its round shape. This part-skim milk variety has a light, buttery, nutty flavor and a smooth, firm texture.

Appearance

Interior: Pale yellow Exterior: Red wax

Texture

Smooth, firm

Flavor

Rich, buttery, slightly sweet

Serving Suggestions

Add new flavor to twice baked potatoes and open faced sandwiches. Enhance creamed pasta dishes such as Fettuccine Alfredo with shredded edam. Create a fresh veggie frittata and top with edam or gouda.

Goes Well With

Chardonnay, Rielsling, Beaujolais, Champagne, Sauvignon Blanc, Pinot Gris, Ciders and Fruit Beers, Brown Ale, Lager, Stout, wholegrain or wheat breads or crackers, water crackers, butter crackers, poultry, pork, beef, vegetables, apples, pears, dried fruit and nuts.

Styles/Varieties

Wisconsin cheesemakers produce edam in smoked, caraway, aged, organic and reduced-fat varieties. 5-pound loaf, 4-pound ball, 2-pound ball, 8-ounce wheel, random and exact weight

Performance Note

Edam, typically made with skimmed milk, has a firm texture; therefore, it slices easily. Keep edam in your slicing case as well as your self-service case.

  Cold Surface Broil Oven (in recipe) Oven (surface) Direct Heat (in suspension)
Sliced
Cubed
Shaved
Shredded
Grated
Crumbled
Spooned/Spread