Description

Spanish for baking, asadero is a rich Mexican-style melting cheese similar to queso oaxaca that is used for cooking. This cottage industry cheese comes in several variations. "Quesadilla," a relatively mild version of asadero, originated in Northern Sinaloa, Mexico. In Wisconsin, asadero is produced by combining the skill of our cheesemakers with the imported techniques of traditional Hispanic cheesemaking.

Appearance

Creamy, off-white

Texture

Creamy, smooth, excellent melting properties

Flavor

Mild, creamy, slightly tangy

Serving Suggestions

Use asadero on tostadas or nachos for flavor and texture; add diced onion, chili peppers, olives and tomatoes. Shred for quesadillas or add cubed asadero to tortilla soup. Make a Mexican white pizza with fresh tomato slices, shredded asadero, sliced onion, cilantro, diced roasted chilies and grilled chicken slices. Make Mexican lasagna using corn tortillas briefly fried and layered with tomato or tomatillo sauce. Add vegetables or meats. Each layer should contain generous amounts of shredded asadero. Try a dessert enchilada or taco. Use shredded asadero and diced fruit such as mango, papaya, nectarines or peaches. Sprinkle with a little nutmeg or cinnamon and a dusting of powdered sugar.

Goes Well With

Fruit, chili peppers, salsa, poultry, beef, pork, tomatoes Sangria, margaritas, pilsner beers, Chardonnay

Styles/Varieties

Wisconsin asadero is available in precut random- and exact-weight pieces, loaves, wheels, half-moons and shreds.

Performance Note

These Mexican-style cheeses are a favorite for cooking and will melt without separating or oiling off, even at relatively high temperatures.

  Cold Surface Broil Oven (in recipe) Oven (surface) Direct Heat (in suspension)
Sliced
Cubed
Shaved
Shredded
Grated
Crumbled
Spooned/Spread